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Dentist in Orlando, FL
Marcia Martinez, D.M.D.
5180 Curry Ford Road
Orlando, FL 32812
(407) 273-6620
Dentist in Orlando, FL Call For Pricing Options!
 
IfAppropriateAntibioticsbeforeImplantSurgeryCouldReduceInfectionRisk

Millions of microorganisms call your mouth home—and while most are friendly, some are not. An invasive procedure like implant surgery can disrupt the mouth's soft tissues and allow disease-causing bacteria to enter the bloodstream.

This isn't necessarily a major concern if your immune system is sound—your body will move quickly to quash any developing infection. But if your body's defense is weak or compromised by other health conditions, an ensuing infection could cause you problems. In the case of a dental implant, a localized infection around it could lead to its failure.

The bone normally grows and adheres to the surface of an implant soon after it's placed, giving it the added strength and durability for which implants are best known. A bacterial infection, though, could impede bone integration and weaken the implant's hold within the jaw.

One way to avoid this is by treating patients at high risk for infection with an antibiotic before the procedure. In one recent study, researchers concluded that patients receiving a 2-gram dose of amoxicillin an hour before implant surgery helped reduce the risk of future implant failure.

But before taking this route, the dentist must first decide whether antibiotic pre-treatment might be more detrimental than beneficial to an individual patient. Antibiotics can cause side effects in certain people ranging from diarrhea to allergic reactions. Healthcare providers must also be prudent with administering antibiotics for the good of society in general—overuse can potentially give rise to antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

A number of healthcare associations highly recommend antibiotic pre-treatment for any dental patient with prosthetic heart valves, a history of infective endocarditis, a heart transplant and similar heart conditions. They also recognize patients with conditions like prosthetic joints, weakened immune systems, diabetics or other serious health problems could also benefit from antibiotic pre-treatment, but leave it to the physician's discretion on whether or not it's appropriate for an individual patient.

If you're planning to undergo implant surgery or a similar procedure and are concerned about infection, speak with your dentist about whether you would qualify and benefit from antibiotic pre-treatment. If appropriate, taking an antibiotic beforehand could minimize your infection risk.

If you would like more information on pre-surgical antibiotic treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Implants & Antibiotics: Lowering Risk of Implant Failure.”

By Marcia Martinez, D.M.D.
September 10, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants   dentures  
Implant-SupportedDenturesCouldImproveYourBoneHealth

Generations have depended on dentures to effectively and affordably replace lost teeth. But they do have a major weakness: They contribute to jawbone loss that creates not only mouth and facial problems, but can also ruin a denture’s fit.

Bone loss is a normal consequence of losing teeth. The biting forces normally generated when we chew stimulate new bone to replace older bone. When a tooth is missing, however, so is that chewing stimulation. This can slow bone replacement growth and gradually decrease the density and volume of affected bone.

While dentures can restore dental appearance and function, they can’t restore this growth stimulation. What’s worse, the pressure of the dentures against the gum-covered jaw ridge they rest upon may irritate the underlying bone and accelerate loss.

But there is a solution to the problem of denture-related bone loss: an implant-supported denture. Rather than obtaining its major support from the gum ridges, this new type of denture is secured by strategically-placed implants that connect with it.

Besides the enhanced support they can provide to a denture restoration, implants can also deter bone loss. This is because of the special affinity bone cells have with an implant’s imbedded titanium post. The gradual growth of bone on and around the implant surface not only boosts the implant’s strength and durability, it can also improve bone health.

There are two types of implant-supported dentures. One is a removable appliance that connects with implants installed in the jaw (three or more for the upper jaw or as few as two in the lower). It may also be possible to retrofit existing dentures to connect with implants.

The other type is a fixed appliance a dentist permanently installs by screwing it into anywhere from four and six implants. The fixed implant-supported denture is closer to the feel of real teeth (you’ll brush and floss normally), but it’s usually more costly than the removable implant-supported denture.

While more expensive than traditional ones, implant-supported dentures still cost less than other restorations like individual implant tooth replacements. They may also help deter bone loss, which may lead to a longer lasting fit with the dentures. Visit your dentist for an evaluation of your dental condition to see if you’re a good candidate for this advanced form of dental restoration.

If you would like more information on implant-supported dentures, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Overdentures & Fixed Dentures.”

By Marcia Martinez, D.M.D.
September 05, 2019
Category: Oral Health
Tags: dental care  
DentalOfficeInfectionControlProtectsYouFromViralInfection

Visiting the dentist for regular cleanings and needed dental work can do wonders for keeping your teeth and gums in tip-top shape. But if you’ve seen or heard about infections occurring in healthcare facilities, you might be a little concerned that your trip to the dentist might expose you to one. Don’t be! You and your family will be out of harm’s way because your dental team has made protection from viruses, bacteria and other infectious agents a top priority. To highlight this effort, the American Academy of Oral Medicine commemorates each September as “National Dental Infection Control Awareness Month.”

As a healthcare provider, dentists have a legal, moral and ethical obligation to protect patients (and staff members too) from infection through what are known as “standard precautions.” These include barrier protection, disinfection and sterilization practices, and safe disposal of contaminated items.

But dentists and their professional organizations don’t stop with the minimum requirements—they’re committed to a higher standard when it comes to infection control. The bedrock for this commitment is adherence to an infection control checklist developed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC), updated regularly. This in-depth checklist recommends several best practices and protocols, including:

  • Creating a written infection control plan that outlines all practices and procedures to be followed by the provider and staff;
  • Barrier protection, including the wearing of disposable gloves, face shields or gowns by providers as appropriate;
  • Proper disposal methods for used items;
  • Proper hand washing and other hygiene practices before and after treatment procedures;
  • Proper disinfection and sterilization of instruments and equipment;

Most licensing bodies also require that dentists and their staff undergo continuing education in infection control, usually every two years.

Because you as a patient have a right to know the details about your medical and dental care, you have public access to infection control guidelines and requirements. You can also ask your dental provider about what steps they take to protect you and your family from infectious disease. They’ll be glad to answer any questions you have to put your mind at ease about your safety.

The dental profession’s commitment to patient and staff safety has drastically reduced the risk of any infection. Rest assured, your dental visit will be beneficial for your oral health—and safe for your general health too.

If you would like more information about infection control in the dental office, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Infection Control in the Dental Office” and “Shingles, Herpes Zoster: A One-Sided Facial Rash.”

By Marcia Martinez, D.M.D.
August 31, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants   diabetes  
DiabetesDoesntHavetoStopYouFromAcquiringDentalImplants

One of the best and most successful tooth replacement choices available is the dental implant. No other restorative method is as similar in both form and function to a real tooth as an implant; and with a success rate of 95-plus percent after ten years, it’s one of the most durable.

But there can be extenuating circumstances that make obtaining an implant difficult or sometimes impossible. One possible problematic situation is the systemic disease diabetes.

Diabetes is a hormonal condition in which the body is unable to sufficiently regulate the amount of glucose (a basic sugar that provides energy to the body’s cells) within the blood stream. Normally, the pancreas produces the hormone insulin to reduce excess glucose. But diabetes interferes with this insulin production: if you have Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas has stopped producing insulin altogether; if you have the more common Type 2, the body doesn’t produce adequate insulin or it doesn’t respond sufficiently to the insulin produced.

Over time diabetes can affect other areas of health, especially wound healing. Because the condition gradually causes blood vessels to narrow and stiffen, the normal inflammatory response to disease or trauma can become prolonged. This in turn slows the rate of wound healing.

Slow wound healing can have a bearing on the recovery period just after implant surgery, especially the necessary integration process that takes place between the bone and the titanium metal implant that provides its signature strength. If that process is impeded by slow wound healing caused by diabetes, the risk increases dramatically for implant failure.

That’s the worst case scenario if you have diabetes, but only if your condition is out of control. If, however, you have your blood sugar levels well regulated through medication, diet and exercise, then your chances for implant success could easily be on par with someone without diabetes.

So if you’re diabetic and are considering dental implants for missing teeth, it’s important to discuss the possibility of obtaining them with both your dentist and the physician caring for your diabetes. With your overall healthcare team working together, there’s no reason why diabetes should stop you from enjoying this premiere restoration for missing teeth.

If you would like more information on obtaining dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants & Diabetes.”

By Marcia Martinez, D.M.D.
August 26, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: root resorption  
CatchRootResorptionEarlyforBestChancesofSavingYourTooth

As your dental provider, we're always alert for signs of tooth decay or periodontal (gum) disease, the two leading causes of tooth loss. But we're also watching for less common conditions that could be just as devastating.

Root resorption falls into this latter category: it occurs when a tooth's root structure begins to break down and dissolve (or resorb).  It's a normal process in primary ("baby") teeth to allow them to loosen and give way when permanent teeth are ready to erupt.

It's not normal, though, for permanent teeth. Something internally or—more commonly—externally causes the root structure to break down. External resorption usually occurs at the neck-like or cervical area of a tooth around the gum line. Known as external cervical resorption (ECR), it can first appear as small, pinkish spots on the enamel. These spots contain abnormal cells that cause the actual damage to the root.

We don't fully understand how root resorption occurs, but we have identified certain factors that favor its development. For example, it may develop if a person has experienced too much force against the teeth during orthodontic treatment. Injury to the periodontal ligaments, teeth-grinding habits or some dental procedures like internal bleaching may also contribute to later root resorption.

Early diagnosis is a major part of effective treatment for root resorption. Because it's usually painless and easily overlooked, resorption is often too difficult to detect in its early stages without x-rays—a good reason for regular dental exams. Beginning spots or lesions are usually small enough to surgically remove the tissue cells causing the damage and then filled with a tooth-colored filling material. If it has advanced further, we may also need to perform a root canal treatment.

At some point, the damage from root resorption can be too great, in which case it might be best to remove the tooth and replace it with a dental implant or similar restoration. That's why catching root resorption early through regular dental exams can give you the edge for saving your tooth.

If you would like more information on diagnosing and treating root resorption, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Root Resorption: An Unusual Phenomenon.”





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