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Dentist in Orlando, FL
Marcia Martinez, D.M.D.
5180 Curry Ford Road
Orlando, FL 32812
(407) 273-6620
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Posts for: February, 2013

By Marcia Martinez, D.M.D.
February 26, 2013
Category: Oral Health
UnderstandingToothSensitivity

Tooth sensitivity is an issue that can range from a slight twinge at times to downright excruciating pain. However, before we continue, understanding the cause of tooth sensitivity is helpful to both relieving and treating it.

Tooth enamel is inert in that it has no nerve supply and thus it protects the teeth from temperature and pressure changes — the main cause of sensitivity. Once it is compromised, worn thin, or exposed due to gum recession, it leaves the delicate nerve fibers within the dentin vulnerable to touch, acid, and temperature change. These nerve fibers most often grab your attention when they come in contact with heat, cold, or a “double whammy” combination of both cold and sweet. They also become sensitive to touch — even the bristles of a soft toothbrush can irritate exposed dentin.

As for the causes of tooth sensitivity, one common cause we see is aggressive brushing. Yes, too much brushing can be bad for you! To be more specific, excessive, improper brushing with a sawing back and forth motion can erode the gum tissues, expose, wear, and even groove the dentin. Another cause for sensitivity can be from the destructive process of tooth decay that eats through the enamel and into the dentin.

If you are experiencing tooth sensitivity or have questions about this condition, please contact us to schedule an appointment. Or you can learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Sensitive Teeth.”


By Marcia Martinez, D.M.D.
February 15, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   tmd   tmj  
TheTemporomandibularDisorderTMDPainCycle

When it comes to chronic pain, one of the most common problems you can face is Temporomandibular Disorder (TMD), which was formerly known as Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMJ). TMD is a condition that can be tricky to diagnose because it frequently mimics other conditions. This is why many healthcare professionals refer to it as “the great imposter.” However, regardless of what it is called, the pain it causes is real and can become quite severe — especially if left undiagnosed and untreated.

To grasp the condition fully, you must first understand the TMD pain cycle. It can start with any traumatic, psychological, metabolic, or mechanical stimulant that causes spasm in the muscles that move the jaw joints (opening, closing, chewing, and even smiling.) This is because of the constricted blood supply to the muscles resulting in less oxygen along with the accumulation of waste products. This is followed by chemical changes in the muscles and a buildup of lactic acid due to muscle fatigue. Abnormal or involuntary muscle contractions or spasms lead to pain signals to the brain that can stop muscle movement. Depending on the severity, this cycle can repeat itself resulting in acute pain that may be extremely severe at times. The pain may then seem to disappear only to resurface again later. The good news is that our office has highly trained professionals who cannot only diagnose but also treat your TMD.

If you suffer from chronic jaw pain and feel that you might have TMD, please let us know so that we can address your concerns and conduct a thorough history and examination. Or if you are in constant or severe pain, contact us immediately to schedule an appointment. You can learn more about the signs, symptoms, and treatment options for TMD by reading the article “TMD — Understanding The Great Imposter.”


By Marcia Martinez, D.M.D.
February 10, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
ToothReplacementItsComeaLongWay

Twenty-first Century techniques can create a replacement for a missing or damaged tooth that looks exactly like a natural tooth and actually fuses with the bone of your jaw. How does this amazing technology work? Test your knowledge on these questions.

What is a dental implant?
A dental implant is actually a replacement for the root of a tooth. In the natural tooth, the root is the part of the tooth below the gum line that is suspended in the bone by ligaments that attach the root to the bone. An implant is a root like substitute that is directly attached to the bone by a process referred to as osteointegration. An implant crown is then attached to the implant and is the visible part that we see above the gum tissues.

What is a modern dental implant made of?
Most are made of titanium. This metal is not rejected by the body and in fact fuses with the bone in which the implant is anchored, making it extremely stable.

How long do implants last?
A successful implant can last a lifetime. Factors that can affect an implant's success are smoking, certain drugs, osteoporosis, a history of radiation treatment, or a compromised immune system. We will evaluate all your conditions of dental and general health before deciding on an implant for you.

What makes the crown look like a real tooth?
The new crown looks real if it matches the shape and color of adjacent natural teeth. Its appearance also depends on what we as dentists refer to as the emergence profile (the way the crown seems to emerge from the gum tissue).

What is the function of a temporary crown?
A customized temporary crown can allow details of color, shape, and emergence profile to be worked out during this “temporary” phase of treatment. It can also test whether the tooth will function correctly for speech, biting and chewing. After these details are worked out, the temporary crown can be used as a blueprint for the permanent one.

What is the first step to getting a dental implant?
Make an appointment with us for a full assessment, diagnosis, and plan for placing the implant and crown.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss any additional questions about dental implants. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants, Your Third Set of Teeth.”


By Marcia Martinez, D.M.D.
February 03, 2013
Category: Oral Health
LearntheSignsofPeriodontalDisease

Periodontal (gum) diseases are sometimes called “silent” because those who have them may not experience painful symptoms. But certain signs point to the existence of these common diseases. If you are experiencing any of the symptoms below, it is time to visit our office so these problems can be treated before they lead to serious infection and loss of teeth.

Gums that bleed during the brushing of teeth. Some people think that gums bleed from brushing too hard. In fact, healthy gum tissues will not bleed with normal brushing. The usual cause of bleeding gums is an accumulation of dental plaque in the areas where your teeth meet your gums. Plaque is a film of bacteria, called a biofilm, which accumulates on your teeth. If you are not brushing and flossing effectively, plaque irritates your gum tissues and causes an inflammation and swelling called gingivitis. This causes your gums to bleed easily on contact with a toothbrush or floss.

Gum tissues that appear red and swollen. If plaque is allowed to accumulate for 24 hours or more, the inflammation in your gum tissues becomes chronic. The continuous presence of bacteria makes it impossible for your body's natural defenses to fight the infection. Chronic inflammation leads to a breakdown of the normal attachment between the teeth and the gums, causing the formation of “pockets.” Inside these pockets the infection continues to attack the tissues that support your teeth. Eventually this can lead to a breakdown of the bone that surrounds your teeth.

Bad breath. Bad breath is another sign of accumulated plaque. The bacteria in plaque may emit gases that have an unpleasant odor.

Gums that are sensitive to hot or cold. Chronic inflammation can also cause the gums to recede, exposing the roots of the teeth in which nerves may be close to the surface, leading to sensitivity to heat and cold.

Teeth that are getting loose, or a painful area in the gums. If you experience these symptoms, the infection has progressed a long way from the “silent” stage. It is time to seek immediate professional help.

If you answered “yes” to any of the above questions, a professional dental examination is in order. With daily removal of plaque by effective brushing and flossing, along with frequent professional cleanings to remove any plaque that you were unable to catch, you will go a long way to preventing periodontal disease. Also, be aware that smoking tends to mask the effects of gum disease. Generally, if you smoke your gums will not bleed when brushing or flossing, nor will they show signs of swelling.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about gum disease. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Bleeding Gums” and “Warning Signs of Periodontal (Gum) Disease.”