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Dentist in Orlando, FL
Marcia Martinez, D.M.D.
5180 Curry Ford Road
Orlando, FL 32812
(407) 273-6620
Dentist in Orlando, FL Call For Pricing Options!
 

Posts for: November, 2013

By Marcia Martinez, D.M.D.
November 26, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants   dentures   bridgework  
WhenSomeoneYouCareForNeedsToothReplacement

Americans today can expect to have a longer lifespan than ever before. And, as our population ages, our concern is no longer just longevity… it becomes, in addition, the quality of life. These days, the task of helping an older person — perhaps a parent, relative, or friend — to maintain a good quality of life often falls to adult children or others in the extended family. These caregivers have a crucial role in deciding how best to provide for an older person's care.

Eating a healthful diet, getting moderate exercise and having an invigorating social life are factors that can improve quality of life for a person of any age. But we would propose adding one more item: keeping a healthy smile. By age 74, about one in four people have lost all of their permanent teeth. Many more have failing teeth, or only a few teeth remaining. According to actuarial tables, these folks can expect to live, on average, to age 86 — and some will live much longer. That's a long time to go without good replacement teeth.

The Old School: Bridges and Dentures

What's the best method of tooth replacement? The answer depends on several factors. If just a small number of teeth are missing, the best options available are a fixed bridge (also called a fixed partial denture) or a dental implant. If most or all teeth are failing or lost, either complete or partial removable dentures, or implants, may be considered. We'll come back to implants later, but let's look at other methods first.

The dental bridge is a traditional method of closing a gap in your smile — but it has some drawbacks. It requires crowning or “capping” healthy teeth on either side of the gap, so they can be used to anchor a series of prosthetic teeth. This means a significant amount of tooth material must be removed from “good” teeth, which may leave them more susceptible to decay. Root canal treatment may also be required. A bridge can make gum disease more likely, and it is generally expected to need replacement in about ten years.

Removable dentures, both complete and partial, have been around even longer than bridges — in fact, they go back centuries. Denture problems, too, are legendary: They include problems with chewing and speaking, unpleasant smells and tastes, the inability to eat many favorite foods, and the tendency of dentures to become loose and ill-fitting over time. Many of these problems force a person to make compromises in their lifestyle; the last one, however, points to a serious flaw with dentures.

When teeth are lost, the underlying bone in the jaw begins to be resorbed (melted away) by the body's natural processes. This causes the jawbone to become weaker — and, as support for the facial features is lost, it can result in the appearance of premature aging. Dentures don't stop bone loss, in fact, they accelerate it. When dentures stop fitting properly, it's evidence of the process of bone loss at work.

A Modern Solution: Dental Implants

There's a great way to stop bone loss and restore teeth to full function: the dental implant. Whether it's a single tooth or an entire set of teeth that are missing, dental implants are the new gold standard for tooth replacement. Because of the way they become fused with the living bone tissue of the jaw, implants stop bone loss form occurring. They “feel” and function like natural teeth — and they can be almost impossible to tell from the real thing.

A single missing tooth can be replaced by one dental implant, where a bridge would require a minimum of three prosthetic teeth (one for the missing tooth, and two for the supports). On the other hand, an entire arch (top or bottom row) of replacement teeth can be anchored by just four to six implants. And, with regular care, implants can last a lifetime.

So if you're helping someone choose between different methods of tooth replacement, be sure to consider the advantages of dental implants. It's an investment in quality — both the quality of the implant itself, and the enhanced quality of life it provides. If you would like more information, or wish to schedule a consultation, please call our office. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Dental Implants” and “Removable Full Dentures.”


By Marcia Martinez, D.M.D.
November 18, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
NewMaterialsAreReplacingGoldInTodaysDentalCrowns

A “crown” or a “cap” is the term used to restore a decayed or broken tooth that needs to be completely encased to protect the tooth beneath it. A crown's dual purpose is to restore the tooth's form and function. Decades ago gold was the material of choice for a crown. What we ultimately choose depends on a particular crown's requirements with regard to the tooth's appearance and function, and to some extent what you want.

Gold: Gold crowns last the longest and wear the best (at about the same rate as natural teeth), but they are not used as frequently today, especially if they are visible in a person's smile. Gold crowns are made of cast gold, a technique that has been in use for over a hundred years. They can last for decades, and have been known to last 50 years or more. They tend to cost less per tooth than porcelain or other materials.

All-Porcelain: “All porcelain” crowns have a natural appearance and as technology improves they are gaining popularity. Dental porcelains are composed of ceramic substances that are variations of glass. This gives them their translucent, lifelike appearance — but it makes them brittle and subject to fracture. Therefore all-porcelain crowns may not be a good choice for back teeth because they frequently fail under the biting forces applied during chewing and especially adverse habits like tooth clenching or grinding. Porcelain crowns are made of material that doesn't wear. Consequently, it can cause excessive wear to the teeth they bite against.

Porcelain-Fused-to-Metal (PFM): PFM crowns have been in use for more than 40 years. They combine a substructure of gold or platinum for strength and have porcelain “facings” for the visible surfaces. In some ways they combine the best of both worlds, but they do have some problems; the metal can show through the porcelain, detracting from its life-like appearance. These crowns can have a functional lifespan of about 20 years or more.

New and Future Materials: Newer “pressed-ceramic” restorations and computer-milled ceramics have received good reviews for aesthetics and service. These new materials are being intensively researched. Initial results look good, but we'll have to see how they last over time.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment or to discuss your questions about crowns and other dental restorations. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Gold or Porcelain Crowns?


By Marcia Martinez, D.M.D.
November 15, 2013
Category: Oral Health
OralCareTipsforyourToddler

Caring for a young child can be overwhelming at times. Sometimes, it may feel like you can't read enough books to learn the correct way to do everything from potty training to feeding. It's also important to teach your child healthcare habits during these crucial years, so that they continue these habits for a lifetime!

Here are a few simple ways you can help your child to institute lifetime oral care habits.

  1. DO: Encourage your Child to Brush Every Day with Fluoride Toothpaste. Fluoride will help make your child's teeth more resistant to tooth decay. You should use a thin smear of fluoride toothpaste for children under age two and a pea-sized amount for older children. At age two, you can also begin empowering your child to brush, but make sure that you supervise and finish the job. Your child will probably need your help until around the age of six.
  2. DON'T: Share your Germs. Did you know that children are not born with the bacteria that cause tooth decay? In fact, the bacteria are transmitted to them from adults! You should never share a cup or spoon with your child. Also, next time you kiss your child, kiss him or her on the cheeks instead of the lips. Believe it or not, you can transmit harmful bacteria through this quick little kiss.
  3. DO: Limit your Child's Sugar Intake. When your child consumes sugar, the bacteria use the sugar to produce acids that dissolve tooth enamel, eventually leading to tooth decay. Saliva can neutralize those acids, but it needs enough time, 30 to 60 minutes, to work its magic. That is why it is important to limit sugar intake between meals.
  4. DON'T: Give Your Child a Bottle at Night. Juice, milk and even breast milk contain sugars that promote tooth decay, in particular during sleep, when less saliva is being produced. So, though it may be tempting, do not let your child go to bed with a bottle.
  5. DO: Take your Child to the Dentist Early. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends that all children have their first dental visit by the age of one. Your toddler will benefit from regular dental visits, because we will monitor tooth decay, correct brushing techniques and also, most importantly, ensure that he or she is comfortable in the dental chair.
  6. DON'T: Allow your Child to Suck His or Her Thumb Past Age Three. Thumb sucking for comfort is a very normal behavior for babies and toddlers. However, if your child constantly sucks his or her thumb past the age of three, it can affect teeth alignment and jaw development.

If you would like more information about oral care for your child, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dentistry and Oral Health for Children.”


By Marcia Martinez, D.M.D.
November 14, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: Orlando   Infants   Cavity  
family dentist orlando flYou know how easily germs can spread. If you use your hands to cover a cough or sneeze, you easily pass germs by touching other things or people. Hygiene practices are becoming more important as the number of flu and the common cold cases rise during the drop in temperature.
 
To avoid spreading germs, you don’t share drinks or utensils, constantly wash your hands and use tissues to block those sneezes and coughs. People tend to practice better hygiene when there are babies around. Even when you aren’t sick, it’s important to use caution at all times, especially around babies. Why? Because studies show that saliva transfer—from utensils, cups or food—can increase the chances of your baby developing a cavity.
 

Saliva Transfer

You might ask, “How is that even possible?” Over the course of 30 or more years, dental professionals and researchers have been publishing studies that focus on saliva transfer. In your saliva, you can have cavity-causing bacteria (streptococcus mutans), and we all know how easily bacteria can spread. Simply blowing on hot food for your child can pass the bacteria onto the food, which your child will eat.
 
Babies and young children’s gums and teeth are in a developmental stage, so they are easily susceptible to bacterial infections. To make sure you don’t pass cavity-causing bacteria to your child, schedule an appointment with your Orlando, Fl dentist. Only if you have active tooth decay can you spread the cavity-causing bacteria. Get your teeth checked out, and think about scheduling an appointment for your young child. After infancy, children can still carry those bacteria until their permanent teeth erupt.
 
Your dentist in Orlando, Dr. Marcia Martinez, can give you the best tips to improve oral health for you and your child.
 
 Call or schedule an appointment to kick cavities to the curb.

By Marcia Martinez, D.M.D.
November 07, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
ProtectingChildrensTeethFromDecayWithSealants

If you were to look closely at many of your teeth, you would notice deep, natural grooves in the enamel surface. Often referred to as “pits and fissures,” these are some of the most difficult places in the mouth to keep clean. Toothbrush bristles simply can't reach deep enough into them to be effective; what's more, their warm, moist environment is the perfect breeding ground for bacterial growth. Consequently, pits and fissures are the most common location for tooth decay.

Children are especially susceptible — pits and fissures account for 43% of tooth decay in patients between the ages of six and seven. This is because when children's teeth erupt (first become visible in the mouth) the new enamel is more permeable and less resistant to decay than older teeth. Until the enamel matures, the risk for decay remains high.

Fortunately, in recent years there has been a decrease in the occurrence of tooth decay among children. Better hygiene practices, fluoride products and fluoridated drinking water, better nutrition, and regular dental visits are all factors in this improvement. One development in particular provides children an extra layer of protection — the use of sealants on the tooth surfaces.

Sealants are protective coatings applied to tooth surfaces, especially in pits and fissures that act as a barrier between bacteria and the immature enamel. Although the degree and extent of sealant use varies across the profession, many dentists recommend sealant application in children for all permanent molars and many primary molars soon after eruption.

The accessibility of regular dental care also plays a factor — those who have no or limited access (and thus are at high risk for tooth decay) may benefit from sealants on all of their back teeth, while children with regular care access (low risk) may need only a few. In fact, some dentists only recommend sealants in low-risk children when tooth decay is already present and after first removing as much decay as possible.

The goal, of course, is to prevent decay, or reduce its effects, in children. Sealants can help, but only when coupled with other measures — and a good habit of oral hygiene.

If you would like more information on sealants for children's teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Sealants for Children.”