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Dentist in Orlando, FL
Marcia Martinez, D.M.D.
5180 Curry Ford Road
Orlando, FL 32812
(407) 273-6620
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Posts for: May, 2014

By Marcia Martinez, D.M.D.
May 30, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene   oral cancer  
TheImportanceofOralHygieneDuringCancerTreatment

You're probably aware of some of the adverse side effects of treatment for cancer. Unfortunately, one of these side effects is the health of your mouth. In fact, more than one third of people treated for cancer develop oral side effects.

Cancer treatments, such as chemotherapy and radiation, attack cancer cells, but normal cells are also affected. Chemotherapy can affect the lining tissues of the mouth and the salivary glands, and radiation treatment can affect all tissues in its path, which will put you at higher risk for dental diseases, such as tooth decay and gum disease. You may also develop painful mouth sores as well as dry mouth.

The best approach to take when it comes to protecting yourself from these potential side effects is prevention. Here are a few steps you can take to defend yourself:

  • Get a Comprehensive Dental Examination. While in the planning stages for your cancer treatment, you should schedule an appointment with our office for a complete dental exam. We will ensure that you oral health is optimal before you undergo treatment. We will also provide detailed instructions on how to care for your teeth during treatment and how to recognize the problem signs. Some solutions we may recommend are a fluoride treatment or antibacterial rinse.
  • Keep up with your Oral Hygiene Routine. While cancer treatment may cause you to feel fatigued, it will be more important than ever for you to take good care of your teeth. Remember to brush twice daily with a soft brush and fluoride toothpaste. You should also floss once a day to clean between your teeth.
  • Keep your Mouth Moist. Dry mouth is a common side effect of radiation and chemotherapy, and along with dry mouth comes a higher risk for tooth decay. We may recommend salivary stimulating medications to fight against this condition. You should also avoid mouth rinses with alcohol, which tend to further dry out your mouth. Make sure to drink plenty of water and consider chewing gum with xylitol, which promotes salivation and actively prevents tooth decay.
  • Remain Alert. Throughout treatment, you should continue to look for signs of oral discomfort in the teeth, jaws and lining of your mouth. Notify both your oncologist and our office if you experience any side effects involving your mouth.

If you would like more information about oral health and cancer treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Oral Health During Cancer Treatment.”


By Marcia Martinez, D.M.D.
May 22, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: jaw pain  
JawPainCouldbeLinkedtoOtherPainCausingConditions

Chronic pain and reduced function of the jaw joints, muscles and other surrounding tissues is generally known as a temporo-mandibular joint disorder (TMJD or TMD). It’s also possible that sufferers of TMD may also experience chronic pain in other parts of the body.

TMD affects from 10 million to 36 million American adults, mostly women of childbearing age. Although the exact causes are still elusive, most researchers believe this family of conditions arises from a combination of gender, genetic, environmental and behavioral factors. This may also hold the key to its connection with other painful conditions in the body.

About two-thirds of patients with some form of chronic jaw pain or disability also suffer from three or more similar medical conditions, including fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, headaches or sleep disturbances. Investigating the connections between these conditions is a fertile area for developing treatment strategies that would benefit all of these associated conditions.

In the meantime, there are both thermal and surgical treatments for alleviating and managing pain associated with TMD. About 90% of TMD patients respond well to thermal treatments, including hot and cold compresses applied to the jaw area and hot baths. Surgical treatment, however, has a mixed result: some studies show only a third of those undergoing surgical procedures experience noticeable pain relief and restored function and nearly half indicate worse symptoms after the surgery.

The best approach is to begin with an examination by your primary physician or specialist to be sure you are not suffering from a medical condition mimicking the symptoms of TMD. If this should eventually lead to a diagnosis of TMD, you should first try thermal techniques with over-the-counter pain relievers to ease the symptoms. A diet with softer foods that don’t require strenuous chewing may also prove helpful.

If you receive a recommendation for extensive bite treatment or surgery, you should discuss this thoroughly with your dentist, or even seek a second opinion. Surgical treatments in particular are not reversible and the results may not be favorable.

For more information on TMD and networking opportunities with other patients, be sure to visit the TMJ Association (www.tmj.org) on the Web.

If you would like more information on chronic jaw pain, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Chronic Jaw Pain and Associated Conditions.”


By Marcia Martinez, D.M.D.
May 15, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: Dentistry  

Why Should You Visit Your Dentist Regularly?

Is your day jam-packed with tasks? Do you feel like you’re constantly planning the next outing, when to pick up the kids from soccer practice, or what to make for dinner? You lead a busy life—we get it! So we also understand that it can be difficult to pencil in a trip to the dentist somewhere between the play dates and business meetings; however, it’s time to put your dental health first. Plus, wouldn’t you rather have business associates and colleagues noticing your clever ideas rather than your yellowing smile?Visit Your Dentist
 
Tooth decay continues to be the leading dental disease in both children and adults. Between living in a world where sugar rules and fast food is often preferred, we neglect our teeth and mouths. However, we should never take our teeth for granted. Here are the main reasons to put your next dental appointments at the top of your to-do list.
  • Stop problems in their tracks: Sure you might find yourself indulging in more sweets and junk food lately. That can be fun every once in a while, but it truly takes a toll on the health of your mouth over time. Plus, if you’re not visiting the dentist twice a year, your teeth aren’t getting the proper care they need to stay healthy. Regardless of your diet, everyone should visit the dentist every six months for a cleaning. Take control of your health and stop problems in their tracks before they even occur. Gum disease and cavities are serious problems but easily preventable. There’s no reason to suffer with these ailments when a dentist can catch it before it becomes a full-blown issue. Take care of things now so you don’t have to deal with bigger problems down the road.
  • You might learn something: Everyone assumes they know how to properly brush their teeth. “I’ve been doing it since I was little,” everyone seems to chant; however, you would be surprised how many people don’t truly know how to properly brush their teeth or even use floss. However, your dentist can be there to easily guide you through proper oral hygiene, as well as brushing and flossing techniques that can help make at-home care easy and effective.
  • Teeth are constantly changing: You don’t always know what’s really going on in your mouth. While you might check out your teeth in the mirror and think those pearly whites look fantastic, there could be problems lingering that you might not see on the surface. That’s why dentists do X-rays once a year. This helps them check enamel density to pinpoint potential cavities, gum tissue health, and see if wisdom teeth or other teeth have shifted or changed the shape of your smile. Just because you don’t see it in the mirror, doesn’t mean there isn’t a cause for concern. Get X-rays once a year to ensure that your mouth is up to par.
  • Good habits produce other good habits: It’s infectious—and in a good way! If you start making your dental health a priority, it can make it easier to make other aspects of your health a habit, too. If you’re used to making room in your busy schedule to see your dentist, you’ll also find it easier to schedule your next cardiologist or gastroenterologist appointment. Good choices often breed other good choices. The minute you start making your health a priority, you’ll immediately notice positive changes.
So stop what you’re doing and make sure to contact us for your next appointment at (407) 273-6620. We’re happy you’ve made your dental health a priority!

DidYouKnowMinorToothContouringandReshapingCanEnhanceYourSmile

Some dental procedures that can beautify a smile — orthodontics or implants, for example — take months. Others take only minutes! Tooth contouring and reshaping is one of them. So just what is this remedy, and why would you need it?

Tooth contouring involves removing a tiny amount of enamel (the tooth’s outer covering) with a dental drill to sculpt a more pleasing shape and make the tooth fit in better with its neighbors. It is most often used on highly visible teeth that have minor yet noticeable cosmetic flaws.

For example, you may have a tiny chip in a front tooth, a slight size discrepancy among adjacent teeth, or extra-pointy canines. None of these issues are as serious as, say, a misaligned bite or a tooth that’s missing altogether — but they can be annoying nonetheless. If you find yourself staring in the mirror at any of these subtle yet distracting imperfections in your own smile, you may want to consider having us reshape a specific tooth or teeth.

Contouring can correct small chips, uneven tooth length, slight overlaps, and tooth edges that are too flat or pointy. We can also give teeth a more “feminine” or “masculine” appearance, simply by rounding or squaring the edges. Contouring also has a non-cosmetic use: It can be employed to adjust the bite so that the teeth come together more evenly. For example, if one tooth is just a little higher than the others, it might be subjected to more than its share of stress during chewing. This brings up another important point: We would not recommend tooth contouring if any bite imbalances could result from the procedure. And if we do determine that tooth contouring would not be the best way to go in your particular case, don’t worry — we can come up with a solution for any cosmetic issues that are of concern to you.

If you have any questions about tooth contouring and reshaping — or any other cosmetic dentistry procedures — please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “How and Why Teeth Wear.”


HelpYourMouthsAbilitytoFightToothDecayWithBetterHygieneandDiet

Your teeth have enemies — bacteria that feed on biofilm, a thin layer of food remnant known as plaque that sticks to your teeth, are one such example. After ingestion, these bacteria produce acid, which can erode your teeth’s protective enamel and lead to tooth decay.

Fortunately, you have a weapon against enamel loss already at work in your mouth — saliva. Saliva neutralizes high levels of acid, as well as restores some of the enamel’s mineral content lost when the mouth is too acidic (re-mineralization).

Unfortunately, saliva can be overwhelmed if your mouth is chronically acidic. Here’s how you can help this powerful ally protect your enamel and stop tooth decay with better hygiene and eating habits:

Remove bacterial plaque daily. You should floss and brush with fluoride toothpaste everyday to remove plaque. It’s also recommended that you visit us twice a year for professional cleanings to remove hard to reach plaque. We can also train you on how to properly floss and brush.

Wait an hour after eating to brush. It may sound counterintuitive, but brushing immediately after you eat can do more harm than good. The mouth is naturally acidic just after eating and some degree of enamel softening usually occurs. It takes a half hour or so for saliva to restore the mouth’s pH balance and re-mineralize the enamel. If you brush before then, you may brush away some of the softened enamel.

Limit sweets to mealtimes. Constantly snacking on sweets (or sipping sodas, sports or energy drinks) will expose your teeth to a chronic high level of acid — and saliva can’t keep up in neutralizing it. If you can’t abstain from sugar, at least limit your consumption to mealtime. It’s also a good habit to rinse out your mouth with clear water after drinking an acidic drink to flush out excess acid.

Boost saliva content with supplements. If you suffer from insufficient saliva production or dry mouth, try an artificial saliva supplement. Chewing xylitol gum can also help boost saliva production, as well as inhibit the growth of infection-causing bacteria. We’ll be glad to advise you on the use of these products.

If you would like more information on protecting your teeth from tooth decay, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.